This wasn't even my own account on JSwipe, which has been described as the Jewish Tinder.

JSwipe is neither the first nor the most recent Jewish dating app.

A 20-something with dark brown hair, showing off buff arms in a wifebeater (with the insignia of Jewish fraternity) flashed by on the screen and against my better judgment, I swooned a little.

I don't begrudge anyone who married outside the faith.

I think in modern times interfaith marriages are important.

There are no Woody Allen-style stuttering neurotic attempts to lay out complicated religious philosophy or existential questions about the existence of God; here were quick yes-and-no markers to the Jewish lifestyle practices that could make or break a relationship.

Unfortunately, yours truly couldn't get in on the fun.

What was more fascinating to me is that both Orthodox and non-religious Jewish friends had been using it and talking to me about it in the past month.

Although you can filter for only Jewish options on many dating sites, and even denominations of Judaism on others, JSwipe's layout somehow made it all easier.It launched about nine months ago in timing with Passover (because nothing says love like a story of slavery and eight days of eating a cracker that will ruin your digestive system).Since then, the app has gained over 165,000 users in more than 70 countries, according to its founder.According to the Pew Research Center, almost a full-third (32 percent) of Jews born after 1980 describe themselves as having no religion, more than any other age group.A solid majority of 58 percent of Jews who got married after 2005 chose a spouse outside the faith, compared to the 17 percent of American Jews who got married before 1970.Not only are we less governed by the traditional guilt and pressures to marry in the faith, but American society is less anti-Semitic and gentiles like marrying us, too, including some members of U. political royalty (most recently Chelsea Clinton in 2010).