This gave him ample time to continue experimenting.He returned to his very first idea—a self-updating address book, applying everything he had learned along the way.Initially he had plastered the site with privacy notices (promising not to sell users' emails, etc.) but found it slowed page load times.

updating verizon cell phone 228 - Updating my address book bebo virus

The viral hook consisted of users entering their friends and acquaintances’ contact information, and each person added to a user’s address book would be notified by email and asked for contact details. Its viral coefficient was barely .5: each person led to only ¼ of an additional person signing on to the service, which was too low to result in exponential growth.

For a viral business the Holy Grail is a viral coefficient above 1, where each user is responsible for bringing onboard more than one additional person (on average).

The site generated revenue from banner ads through advertising networks that took a 30-percent cut, and the Birches added e-cards, since it was natural that users would want to send greetings to their friends.

By the time the couple relocated to San Francisco to be closer to Xochi’s family, the site was bringing in $10,000 a month – enough to rent an apartment and a tiny 20-square foot office in the Valley's highly inflated real estate market.

Of all the interviews I did for my book, Viral Loop, the one I enjoyed most was with Michael Birch.

This was about six months after he sold Bebo, the social network he had largely bootstrapped with his wife, Xochi, for 0 million to AOL.

Together they held a 70% equity stake in Bebo and walked away with 5 million – enough, I suppose, to buy a small one-bedroom apartment in the Bay Area.

Then AOL did what it does best and after absorbing Bebo ran it into the ground.

He called it Bebo, a name he chose because it was short, snappy and utterly nonsensical (like Google and Yahoo) so that users could project their own meaning onto it, well worth the ,000 the domain cost.

Later he tuned it into an acronym for “Blog Early, Blog Often.” He put the link up on Birthday Alarm, seeding it with just a few members, and it "went ridiculously viral," so much so he took the link down after 7 days. One million people signed up, 300,000 of them on day nine alone.

By the end of a week you'd have 64 cents and within two weeks, .92; by day 30, about .4 million. You’d have more than

This was about six months after he sold Bebo, the social network he had largely bootstrapped with his wife, Xochi, for $850 million to AOL.Together they held a 70% equity stake in Bebo and walked away with $595 million – enough, I suppose, to buy a small one-bedroom apartment in the Bay Area.Then AOL did what it does best and after absorbing Bebo ran it into the ground.He called it Bebo, a name he chose because it was short, snappy and utterly nonsensical (like Google and Yahoo) so that users could project their own meaning onto it, well worth the $8,000 the domain cost.Later he tuned it into an acronym for “Blog Early, Blog Often.” He put the link up on Birthday Alarm, seeding it with just a few members, and it "went ridiculously viral," so much so he took the link down after 7 days. One million people signed up, 300,000 of them on day nine alone.By the end of a week you'd have 64 cents and within two weeks, $83.92; by day 30, about $5.4 million. You’d have more than $1 billion (of course, most businesses taper off well before then).

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This was about six months after he sold Bebo, the social network he had largely bootstrapped with his wife, Xochi, for $850 million to AOL.

Together they held a 70% equity stake in Bebo and walked away with $595 million – enough, I suppose, to buy a small one-bedroom apartment in the Bay Area.

Then AOL did what it does best and after absorbing Bebo ran it into the ground.

He called it Bebo, a name he chose because it was short, snappy and utterly nonsensical (like Google and Yahoo) so that users could project their own meaning onto it, well worth the $8,000 the domain cost.

Later he tuned it into an acronym for “Blog Early, Blog Often.” He put the link up on Birthday Alarm, seeding it with just a few members, and it "went ridiculously viral," so much so he took the link down after 7 days. One million people signed up, 300,000 of them on day nine alone.

By the end of a week you'd have 64 cents and within two weeks, $83.92; by day 30, about $5.4 million. You’d have more than $1 billion (of course, most businesses taper off well before then).

||

This was about six months after he sold Bebo, the social network he had largely bootstrapped with his wife, Xochi, for $850 million to AOL.

Together they held a 70% equity stake in Bebo and walked away with $595 million – enough, I suppose, to buy a small one-bedroom apartment in the Bay Area.

Then AOL did what it does best and after absorbing Bebo ran it into the ground.

He called it Bebo, a name he chose because it was short, snappy and utterly nonsensical (like Google and Yahoo) so that users could project their own meaning onto it, well worth the $8,000 the domain cost.

billion (of course, most businesses taper off well before then).