It moved its facilities downstream on the River Wear to Pallion in 1857. She did, however, raise the general alarm as to Elm Branch's predicament. It was a 'Puget Sound Tugboat Company' tug however, Tyee I believe, one of two tugs (Tacoma was the other) that attended the scene, that brought Elm Branch safely to Seattle, being later awarded ,500 for her efforts by a Seattle court. 1919 the vessel was sold to to Polish-American Navigation Corp.', of New York, & renamed Wisla. Borrowstounness, Firth of Forth, Scotland, to be broken up.

Pallion, is, I understand, upstream of the present rail & road bridges in central Sunderland, the shipbuilding yard being located (or I should say located since all shipbuilding ended there in 1988) on the south side of the river close to (west of) the Queen Alexandra Bridge - about 3 miles from the mouth of the river. A series of later sales one after the other - in 1922 to Wisla Steamship Corp., of New York, in 1923 to Wabash Steamship Corp., also of New York or maybe of Delaware. And then, in 1924, to 'Jensen Linien Aktieselskab', (H. Evans & Co., of London, & renamed Purley Beeches - though there may have been a sale ahead of that one, to 'D/S Codan'. Gethring, of Aberavon, was her captain for a number of years from Ellen Jensen thru to Purley Beeches.

Similar flow procedures were followed with the other trades - joiners, shipwrights, riggers. The webmaster has a number of editions of Lloyd's Registers, ex Google Books, available to him, see left. long, speed of 12 knots, with a clipper bow & 2 masts, signal letters JLDW. Mitchell) in going below & leaving an able seaman in charge of the deck, & by the default of that able seaman in not keeping a proper look-out. Lugar, the vessel laid cable to connect the Island of Formosa i.e. Built for 'Det Sndenfjelds-Norske Dampskibsselskab', of Kristiania (Oslo), Norway. The vessel would appear to have been seen a few miles N. And is said to have been last sighted by Melbourne on Mar. Gabo Island is a small uninhabited island in Bass Strait, just 500 metres off the coast of Victoria. But I read also that Federal was sighted presumably later that day, in the afternoon, hugging the shore, by the lighthouse keeper at Gabo Island. 111.2 metres long, perpendicular to perpendicular, 365 ft., speed of 10 knots, signal letters LPTC, expressly designed for the Bombay, India, trade. And, later that year presumably, sailed from Shanghai to Puget Sound, Washington, U.

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This enabled the firm to build vessels up to 540 feet in length and of 20,000 tons capacity. It was a patent re improvements in and relating to engines. The three bidders presumably know the answer to that question! Arron, thank you so much for that most interesting information.'Doxford Engine Friends Association' have lots more on the general subject. Further most difficult efforts followed & eventually, Reid Wrecking Company completed the task. 31, 1909, Turret Bell was towed to Charlottetown by wrecking tug James Reid. Reid Wrecking Co., of Sarnia, Ontario, took over ownership in 1907 (not 1909?

The result of these elaborate extensions was that in the next three years, 1905, 1906, and 1907, the output was 87,000 tons, 106,000 tons and 92,000 tons. Listed essentially as follows: 'PATENT SPECIFICATION No. Including some wonderful images - see 'Gallery', via the links above. ) that details about a few Doxford patents are WWW available - you can find them by inserting 'Charles David Doxford patent' into a Google search box.

The new premises, together with a fitting out quay, equipped with a 100 ton radial crane, was commenced in 1902. The vendor stated that the 'mechanical book' was made by White & Pick Ltd., model specialists, of Birmingham. 2017 from an Australian vendor (here), stated to date from 1922. APPLICANT: ROBERT PILE DOXFORD and KARL OTTO KELLER both of Pallion Yard, Sunderland, County of Durham. Opposed-piston engines are already known of a type comprising a pair of parallel cylinders, two pistons in each cylinder reciprocating in them, two cranks allotted to the respective pairs of pistons, and main connecting rods each such rod operatively connecting the piston that is at one end of each cylinder with one of the cranks aforesaid.... Maybe that name was to perpetuate the famous shipbuilding name of William Pile? He has been busy researching the family history & tells me that the mother of 'Robert Pile Doxford' was Hannah Pile, the aunt of William Pile (1823-1873), the famous shipbuilder. And sold for the last time, in 1926, to 'Maura y Aresti', of Bilbao, Spain, & renamed Sodupe. ), 6 ('uboat.net' re Kwasind), 7 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). Peterson it would seem operated as 'Turret Steam Shipping Co. The vessel lay there for the better part of 3 long years.

The original five births were scrapped to make room for three births of greater length and breadth. A most interesting item came up for sale via e Bay in late January 2007. A patent specification that has been disbound from a volume of 100 different patents - an original HMSO published item at the time.'Could that have been the principal patent for the Doxford diesel engine? If so, there may well be a family relationship between the Pile & Doxford families? Arron tells me also that William Pile had a younger brother named 'Thomas Hunter Pile' & that Thomas is Arron's great, great grandfather. The vessel was broken up in Spain in the 4th quarter of 1933. An attempt was made to free her in the summer of 1907 but it failed. 13, 1909, the vessel was towed to Quebec & repaired. Tom Reid of Sarnia and Port Huron eventually salvaged her and sent her back to salt water service as KWASIND'.

The family members depicted include William Doxford (1812/1882), founder of the company (image at left) & W. The webmaster bid on the item, for inclusion in these pages, but was not successful. The next image depicts the railway shed at the Doxford Pallion shipyard on Apl. Four of the locomotives are crane tank locomotives ('Hendon', 'Roker', 'Millfield' & 'Southwick', from left to right) while at extreme right is saddle tank locomotive 'General'. I am advised that rail operations at the yard, ceased in Feb. Thomas & Co.), 4 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). Anon Martinelli', of Rio de Janeiro, & renamed Belem.

Theodore Doxford, his son, (1841/1916), later Sir Theodore Doxford (image at right). 1971, but that all of the 4 locos at left in the image, are preserved. The webmaster has a couple of editions of Lloyd's Registers, ex Google Books, available to him, see left. long, 67.1 metres perpendicular to perpendicular, signal letters JQBF. In 1925, the vessel was sold for the last time, to 'Lloyd National, Martinelli'.

Now to build 25 or so vessels in a year & produce a total of 100,000 tons means that most of them were probably vessels of about 4/5,000 tons each. A kind visitor to this site has provided an amazing amount of data to the webmaster about Sunderland shipbuilders & their ships. I have not provided images on site of the 4 pages since they might be of interest to relatively few site visitors. The image above is of a most interesting item indeed. I now see that members of the Doxford family rejoined the company in 1922 - as senior officials or as managers. Built for 'Hudig & Veder's Stoomvaart Maats' (Hudig & Veder, managers), of Rotterdam, Netherlands, & Rotterdam registered.

And amongst that data is a 'Report to the Shareholders' of 'William Doxford and Sons, Limited', respecting a meeting of Ordinary Shareholders held on March 11, 1907. Images of Doxford family members prominent in the history of the shipbuilding company can be seen here, in a page from a 1922 promotional booklet published by the company. The tiny white area in the middle at the bottom is a cog wheel & when it is rotated the pistons go up and down! After WW1, orders for new ships dried up, & Doxfords closed down from September 1924 to April 1927. I read that in 1946, the company took over the Palmer's Hill, Sunderland, engine works of John Dickinson & Sons Ltd.

William Doxford Page 1, page bottom (turret & whaleback vessels). It would seem that William Doxford and Sons, Limited was established by one William Doxford (1812-1882) in 1840, building wooden boats at Coxgreen (there are a great many references to 'Cox Green' but while Cox Green was correct (a train ticket is here), I understand 'Coxgreen' is correct today), some way upstream from the centre of Sunderland. Elihu Thompson found Elm Branch & tried, unsuccessfully, to tow her to port, but her tow hawser separated. Per 1 (Norwegian page, image, English translation), 2 (data & image, Stiklestad (1), 50% down), 3 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access).

Indeed, the increasing number of listings re Doxford built vessels has already required a 2nd, 3rd & 4th pages - pages 053, 054 & 055. It is clear that the vessel travelled much of the world - ports mentioned in such newspapers are Adelaide, African coast, Antwerp, Astoria, Durban, Mediterranean, Newchang (China), New York, Pensacola, San Francisco & Vancouver. 12, 1900, during a voyage in ballast, Captain Iliff in command, from Nagasaki, Japan, to Puget Sound, Washington, U. A., under charter to Pacific Export Lumber Company, the vessel lost a propeller & anchored near the Umatilla lightship. The newspaper references are 'difficult' but you can read a summation here:- 3.

176 (or maybe 177) 'turret ships' (one authoritative site says 184) were built by Doxford in the years through to 1911. The storm continued to rage & the ship was soon driven inland to just 20 yards from the shore.