A logical extension of this tradition led quilts being made to raise money for other community projects, such as recovery from a flood or natural disaster, and later, for fundraising for war.

Quilting techniques are often incorporated into garment design as well.

Quilt shows and competitions are held locally, regionally, and nationally.

For a subscription quilt, community members would pay to have their names embroidered on the quilt top, and the proceeds would be given to the departing minister.

Sometimes the quilts were auctioned off to raise additional money, and the quilt might be donated back to the minister by the winner.

The pattern of stitching can be the key decorative element if a single piece of fabric is used for the top of a quilt, (a "wholecloth quilt"), but in many cases the top is pieced from a patchwork of smaller fabric pieces; and the pattern and color of these pieces will be important to the design.

In the twenty-first century, quilts are frequently displayed as non-utilitarian works of art There are many traditions regarding the uses of quilts.

The tops were prepared in advance, and a quilting bee was arranged, during which the actual quilting was completed by multiple people.

Quilting frames were often used to stretch the quilt layers and maintain even tension to produce high-quality quilting stitches and to allow many individual quilters to work on a single quilt at one time.

The following is a list of characters from the American situation comedy The Big Bang Theory created and executive produced by Chuck Lorre and Bill Prady, which premiered on CBS on September 24, 2007.