The term caesura comes from the Latin "a cutting" or "a slicing." Some editors will indicate a CALQUE: An expression formed by individually translating parts of a longer foreign expression and then combining them in a way that may or may not make literal sense in the new language.

Algeo provides the example of the English phrase "Decorative work, usually developing from or used to make up an important or introductory initial, or developing from ascenders at the top of the page and descenders at the bottom of the justified text; a series of strokes made by holding a quill constant at one angle to produce broader and narrower lines, which in combination appear to overlap one another to form strap-work"CANCEL: A bibliographical term referring to a leaf which is substituted for one removed by the printers because of an error.

: The melodic pattern just before the end of a sentence or phrase--for instance an interrogation or an exhortation.

NB: Do not confuse the spelling of cannon (the big gun) with canon (the official collection of literary works). Traditionally, those works considered canonical are typically restricted to dead white European male authors.

Many modern critics and teachers argue that women, minorities, and non-Western writers are left out of the literary canon unfairly.

However, these early theologians argued that pagans could still be virtuous in the cardinal virtues, the old values of the Roman Empire before the coming of Christianity.

In Latin terminology, pagan Rome espoused the four cardinal virtues as follows: or an arrowhead pointing upwards. An editor will write a caret underneath a line of text to indicate that a word, letter, or punctuation mark needs insertion at the spot where the two lines converge. "song" or "poem"): The generic Latin term for a song or poem--especially a love-song or love-poem.

(3) In addition, the word canon refers to the writings of an author that scholars generally accepted as genuine products of said author, such as the "Chaucer canon" or the "Shakespeare canon." Chaucer's canon includes The Canterbury Tales, for instance, but it does not include the apocryphal work, "The Plowman's Tale," which has been mistakenly attributed to him in the past.

Likewise, the Shakespearean canon has only two apocryphal plays () that have gained wide acceptance as authentic Shakespearean works beyond the thirty-six plays contained in the First Folio.

In spite of that impossibility, readers know Shakespeare means Hamlet will address Gertrude in a painful, contemptuous way.

In pop music from the 1980s, the performer Meatloaf tells a disappointed lover, "There ain't no hiding the bottom of a crackerjack box." The image of a luxury car hidden as a prize in the bottom of a tiny cardboard candybox emphasizes how unlikely or impossible it is his hopeful lover will find such a fantastic treasure in someone as cheap, common, and unworthy as the speaker in these lyrics.

After Ovid was banished to Tomis by the Emperor in the year 8 AD, he wrote that his crime was "CARPE DIEM: Literally, the phrase is Latin for "seize the day," from carpere (to pluck, harvest, or grab) and the accusative form of die (day).