A Singles’ Dating Convention member sent this to me: “I’ve recently joined a different singles’ site and am running into the same issue I’ve had with the previous ones I’ve been involved in.It seems that somehow my profile targets only those that are looking for money, or are spam. For example, the other night I got a message from a lady on Plenty Of and responded to her and then she quickly responded giving me her Yahoo screen name to IM her.

Unless the online dating industry makes a push toward cleaning up their websites, men and women will continue to fall prey to fake profiles.

You Get What You Pay For It seems the “free” membership sites tend to be the ones most likely to have more fake profiles on them.

After a little while of chatting and waiting and waiting for responses, My response: Unfortunately, you’re running into the sad situation that is online dating.

Too many women have fake profiles that are used for making money, i.e., directing men to paid porn sites or personal Web sites or just asking men outright for money.

Do report a fake profile to your online dating service, it’s at least a step in the right direction—you’ll be helping out by not letting the next guy or girl be faked out.

If a lot of their profile says, “ask me,” or says very little at all, it’s probably a fake.

If a single you’ve contacted can’t answer basic questions, just gives you one or two-word answers, or gets angry that you’ve questioned if they’re legitimate or not, then move on.

Confession time: I've been in talk therapy for more than 20 years (I started when I was 15—today I'm 37).

Therapy has become a customary part of my self-care song-and-dance, despite the sad truth that I haven't seen tons of progress when it comes to my struggles with depression, relationships, et al.