In Louisiana, by 1900, black voters were reduced to 5,320 on the rolls, although they comprised the majority of the state's population.

By 1910, only 730 blacks were registered, less than 0.5% of eligible black men.

"In 27 of the state's 60 parishes, not a single black voter was registered any longer; in 9 more parishes, only one black voter was." The cumulative effect in North Carolina meant that black voters were completely eliminated from voter rolls during the period from 1896–1904.

The growth of their thriving middle class was slowed.

The origin of the phrase "Jim Crow" has often been attributed to "Jump Jim Crow", a song-and-dance caricature of blacks performed by white actor Thomas D.

Rice in blackface, which first surfaced in 1832 and was used to satirize Andrew Jackson's populist policies.

In 1877, a national Democratic Party compromise to gain Southern support in the presidential election resulted in the government's withdrawing the last of the federal troops from the South.

White Democrats had regained political power in every Southern state.

In North Carolina and other Southern states, blacks suffered from being made invisible in the political system: "[W]ithin a decade of disfranchisement, the white supremacy campaign had erased the image of the black middle class from the minds of white North Carolinians." Those who could not vote were not eligible to serve on juries and could not run for local offices.

They effectively disappeared from political life, as they could not influence the state legislatures, and their interests were overlooked.

Democrats passed laws to make voter registration and electoral rules more restrictive, with the result that political participation by most blacks and many poor whites began to decrease.

Between 18, ten of the eleven former Confederate states, starting with Mississippi, passed new constitutions or amendments that effectively disenfranchised most blacks and tens of thousands of poor whites through a combination of poll taxes, literacy and comprehension tests, and residency and record-keeping requirements.

Facilities for African Americans were consistently inferior and underfunded compared to those which were then available to white Americans; sometimes they did not exist at all.