To have a better understanding of these pins the new robot would need to be able to examine the backs of these slabs. The impact-echo probe used by Pyramid Rover covered nearly half the surface area of the blocking slab.Obviously, something of comparable size would not be able to fit through the hole in the first blocking slab, and minimizing damage meant the team could not drill a larger hole.Rover successfully drilled a small hole in the slab, about 2 cm in diameter, while inflicting as little damage as possible.

radiocarbon dating trackback uri closed-6

The SCA had a group of Egyptologists and engineers from Cairo University design a limestone “competition tunnel” in the desert that mimicked the actual pyramid shafts as nearly as possible in terms of size, slope, and conditions.

The panel of judges was an impressive list of experts.

What the Pyramid Rover team discovered was a small chamber formed by the Tura limestone U-block, the basal stone, the blocking slab/door, and a rough block of the local limestone on the opposite side, about 19 cm away from the “door.” But the probe camera had its limitations.

It was fixed inside a rigid tube and had no tilt or pan capabilities—all it could do was look straight ahead.

But now, using technology designed for uses as divergent as space exploration and terrestrial search and rescue, we are finally able to explore the chamber behind Gantenbrink’s Door.

Picking up where we left off with Pyramid Rover, this exclusive covers how the Djedi Team won the “Robot Olympics in the Desert”, the members who make up the team, the specifics of the robot’s design, and the results of Djedi’s maiden voyage up QCS and into the chamber behind the first blocking stone.

But the pyramid shafts are a different type of spelunking and the Supreme Council of Antiquities was determined that whoever they selected for the next mission would leave no footprints at all.

To select which team—Singapore or Leeds—was best able to fulfill the mission and meet all the criteria, Zahi Hawass arranged for the two sides to face off in a sort of robot Olympics in the desert.

The next mission into the Queen’s Chamber shafts would have two primary objectives: Send a robot crawler up QCS to explore the space behind the first blocking slab using the same opening Pyramid Rover had drilled, determine if the rough block at the opposite side was the end of the shaft or another blocking slab, and if the latter, drill a hole through it and see what is behind it.

Send a robot crawler up QCN to drill a hole through blocking slab and see what is on the other side.

The tank-like treads used by Upuaut-2 and Pyramid Rover had left scuff marks on the shafts.