Agriculture: large-scale cultivation of the land, with resulting specialization of labor, domestication of plants and animals, identification with one’s sedentery social group, and a radical separation from the natural world.

The Agricultural (Neolithic) Revolution began ten thousand years ago in the Fertile Crescent, where extensive irrigation turned once-fertile croplands into barren salt pans.

Is there any reason they too should not have somewhat the feeling I do there of coming suddenly out of the mountains into an alpine meadow, or a clearing in dense woods, or a plain after traversing rugged broken country?

Animism: a derogatory anthropological term for what most human cultures have believed throughout prehistory: that the Earth is alive and reactive, as are its many places.

Agribusiness: one that markets farm products and equipment, including warehousing, seed monopolization, and fertilizer.

The corporatization of farming, resulting in a handful of very large non-local companies owning and managing--and in some cases ruining--millions of high-yield acres.

Last summer I saw a timber wolf trotting sedately across an open dune above the water, and time without number rabbits, squirrels and birds, not feeding but seeming to enjoy the peculiar delight that beaches provide.

I cannot speak for them, but is it wrong to believe that they may know something akin to the lift of spirit that is mine when standing on the sands?

It would be interesting to see a study on how many researchers feel separated from Ammonia: a gaseous compound of nitrogen and hydrogen (NH3) formed as a byproduct when bacteria decompose substances high in nitrogen.

Compost piles thick with manure often emit ammonia when hot.

Abandoned Wells: a hazard because wells left on vacated lands can channel water contaminated by pesticides and fertilizer straight down into the water table. Abrasion: the wearing away of rock surfaces by small particles moved by air or water.