It harms sex workers’ ability to insist on condom use and choose their sexual partners.

Porn image of kyrgyzstan-13

When an angry mob overthrew Kyrgyzstan’s autocratic president Kurmanbeck Bakiyev last April, one of the complaints heard most often on the streets of Bishkek, the country’s capital, was that the U. government had been complicit in propping up his regime.

A former Soviet republic once known as the “Switzerland of Central Asia” because of its relatively strong civil society, Kyrgyzstan had suffered in recent years under Bakiyev from grinding poverty, widespread corruption, and government marred by cronyism and contempt for political opposition and independent media.

They present these findings to local ombudsmen’s offices to make authorities aware of violations.

A representative of the group sits on the ombudsman’s advisory committee to ensure that cases are thoroughly investigated.

As sex workers and their allies across the world recognize today as the International Day to End Violence Against Sex Workers, we recognize the community-based organizations in Eastern Europe and Central Asia that are striving to do just that.

With the help of Shakh-Ayim, Elina’s story now sounds a hopeful note.

In Ukraine, despite the fact that sex work is not illegal, sex workers are often illegally arrested, extorted, or abused by police.

To combat this, an organization called Legalife–Ukraine does outreach to educate sex workers about their rights and record accounts of police violence.

But if they can access a lawyer upon arrest, they are more likely to be treated with dignity and be afforded due process.