In the table below, for example, a “CE” date code indicates a production date of May 1992.

On the inside of the cabinets of most Fender amps made after 1950 and before 1970, there might be a “tube location” sticker.

Dating early Fender amplifiers is sometimes quite challenging.

If you are unable to determine the approximate production year of your amplifier using the above charts, there are other means of dating Fender amps.

Several excellent books are available that contain reliable and invaluable information on the history of Fender amplifiers. To use these books most effectively, you’ll need to get the date codes from the speaker frames and potentiometers, and as much other detailed information as you can find about the specs and features of your amp.

First, it will be useful to you to understand the following five terms in order to choose the correct chart for dating your amp: refers to the two-tone woven fabric that covered many early amplifiers.

On early amps, this material was varnished to make it a more durable covering.

Although the dates derived using the charts below will likely be a good approximation, they should not be considered exact.

All Fender amplifiers manufactured from 1990 to the present include a date code, printed on the quality assurance (QA) sticker on the back of the amp chassis.If four digits are present, the first two digits refer to the year (i.e., a “66” would mean 1966).The last two digits refer to the week of the year (i.e., a “26” would mean the 26th week or, roughly, June).This black-and-silver sticker contains several lines for “sign-offs” on completion of sound and electrical testing.The final line contains a date code of two printed or handwritten letters denoting the amplifier’s production date by year (the first letter) and month (the second letter).For example, EIA 606-4-21 would denote the 21st week of 1964.