In a statement, the President said that the 31-year-old, whom he once described as his “mind reader”, had become “a friend and a collaborator on virtually every major speech I’ve given in the Senate, on the campaign trail and in the White House.”Favreau is not simply known for his fine prose.

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Though he was appointed the President’s Director of Speechwriting in the new administration, Favreau – known to his friends as “Favs” – retained some of the traits of his age group.

Between the November 2008 election and the inauguration in January 2009, he was photographed at a party, groping a cardboard cut-out of the newly appointed Secretary of State – and Obama’s one-time bitter electoral rival – Hillary Clinton.

He became a crucial member of the campaign team as Obama ran for the presidency in 2008, and reportedly wrote stump speeches late into the night, kept awake by coffee, Red Bull and rounds of the video game Rock Band.

It was Favreau who worked with the candidate to craft his famous victory address following the Iowa primary in January 2008, which began “They said this day would never come…”, and went on to propel Obama towards the White House.

NBC recently premiered a new sitcom about the White House, 1600 Penn, co-written by 30-year-old Jon Lovett, who spent three years in the Obama administration where he wrote anything from speeches about the financial crisis to jokes for the President’s address at the annual White House Correspondents’ Dinner.

Beau Willimon, writer of a new US remake of the TV political drama House of Cards, was once a campaign aide to Mrs Clinton.“He has the powerful and unique experience of being in the inner circle of the President of the United States.He may be a fantastic science-fiction writer, but I’m particularly excited to see anything he writes about politics, because he has the inside track.”Obama’s senior adviser David Plouffe told the Los Angeles Times he thought Favreau could translate many of the skills of writing for the President to writing for the screen.Jon Lovett is not shy at all about this -- and frankly, I think it's been inspiring and important to have a brilliant gay speechwriter among the other half dozen or so other young future Ted Sorensen's.This is sort of like writing a tribute to Gore Vidal without mentioning that his groundbreaking novel, The City and the Pillar, was a 'gay' novel. Third, the handsome-but-not-gay Tommy Vietor (sorry guys) now needs a roommate.Will still give it a try -- and maybe a ticket back from LA?