It can be fun, terrible, exciting, hard — the adjectives used to describe it are endless.

But this guide was created to help you navigate your way through all those adjectives and shed the only light you’ll ever need on an otherwise confusing, strenuous experience.

Iron is commonly found in the Earth's crust in the form of an ore, usually an iron oxide, such as magnetite or hematite.

Iron is extracted from iron ore by removing the oxygen through its combination with a preferred chemical partner such as carbon which is then lost to the atmosphere as carbon dioxide.

Too little carbon content leaves (pure) iron quite soft, ductile, and weak.

Carbon contents higher than those of steel make a brittle alloy commonly called pig iron.

While iron alloyed with carbon is called carbon steel, alloy steel is steel to which other alloying elements have been intentionally added to modify the characteristics of steel.

Common alloying elements include: manganese, nickel, chromium, molybdenum, boron, titanium, vanadium, tungsten, cobalt, and niobium.

Modern steel is generally identified by various grades defined by assorted standards organizations.

These values vary depending on alloying elements such as manganese, chromium, nickel, iron, tungsten, carbon and so on.

Small quantities of iron were smelted in ancient times, in the solid state, by heating the ore in a charcoal fire and then welding the clumps together with a hammer and in the process squeezing out the impurities.

With care, the carbon content could be controlled by moving it around in the fire.

Steel is an alloy of iron and carbon and other elements.