We’d rather give our money to someone we like than someone we don’t.

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In cases like this, it’s much better to provide enough specific information to compel readers to continue reading than to write something “clever” that doesn’t give readers adequate information to decide whether or not they’re interested.

Here’s another example: With this homepage headline, Rejoiner conveys a specific benefit and singles out who they’re selling to.

In addition to being unique, your headline should be ultra-specific.

It should provide enough information to let customers know whether or not the offer you're presenting is interesting to them. I felt bad for her, but I had no idea what was going on.

Even if the rest of the copy is amazing and would convince 3 out of 10 people to buy, if the headline puts them to sleep, only a fraction of the customers who would have bought something will read your copy and make a purchase.

The headline alone can make or break an ad, homepage, or e-mail subject line. If the headline pulls readers in, you’ll make more sales; if not, you’ll be left wondering what happened.

This leads us to another famous Ogilvy quote: “It follows that unless your headline sells your product, you have wasted 90 percent of your money…” Ogilvy believed headlines were so important that he viewed them as being worth 90% of the money invested in advertising. Headlines are so important that a single word can impact a campaign dramatically.

We’ve seen e-mail subject lines where a one word change increased click-throughs by 46%.

Gary Vaynerchuk did this with Wine Library TV, and Brian Clark did this with Copyblogger.

Mail Chimp is another great example of a business that wins customers over with a unique, approachable personality that stands out from the competition.

That’s a measurable difference that significantly impacts the bottom line. It’s because they’re the first lines of your copy that customers read.