Breedlove," Pomerantsev described Russia's 2014 takeover of Crimea as “the most amazing information warfare blitzkrieg we have ever seen in the history of information warfare." To which Pomernatsev added his own chilling warning: The hearing was put on by Orange County neoconservative Republican Ed Royce; the purpose of the hearings was to drum up fear about Russia's "unprecedented" information war on the West — a propaganda battle which obviously exists, but whose dimensions and dangers are being cynically exaggerated — and then convert that fear into budget money for US propaganda and NGOs to subvert Kremlin power.

What made Pomerantsev's lobbying appearance with the neocons so disturbing to me is that he's not the sort of crude, arrogant meat-head I normally identify with Pomerantsev's book, "Nothing is True and Everything is Possible", is the most talked-about Russia book in recent memory.

His ad agency boss explains how this virtual reality democracy works: “[T]hat's what we call the Duma 3-Ds. And that one over there, sleeping across his newspaper — he's a semi-stiff. Even if we do sit a live human being in front of the camera, his speeches are going to be written by a team of speechwriters, his jackets are going to be chosen by a group of stylists, and his decisions are going to be taken by the Interbank Committee.

What surprised even Dick Morris’ spin-doctor buddies was how effective they were in fooling the raw Russian public into believing that their crude propaganda efforts, distorting reality to falsely portray opposition candidate Zyuganov as a genocidaire-in-waiting, was not propaganda at all.

In the late Soviet times, most Russians knew that the far cruder Soviet propaganda was propaganda—but this was something new, the ability to wildly distort reality, paint your political opponent as the greatest monster in history, and have it accepted as news because it looked much more modern than the crude old Soviet propaganda productions.

But your individual health depends on a variety of factors, including the quality of healthcare in your community, as well as the lifestyle choices you make each day.

The more you know about these facets of your care, the healthier you—and your community—can be. cities where patients, providers and hospitals are getting healthcare right.

Falsifying reality and staging politics became the new avant-garde, attracting figures like Vladislav Surkov—the “political technologist” behind Vladimir Putin’s curtain.

The most popular comical novel of the late 1990s/early 2000s, Viktor Pelevin’s “Generation ‘P’”, tells the story of a second-rate poet who goes from selling vodka in a Moscow kiosk in the early 1990s, to working as an advertising copywriter and "political technologist" in the belly of Russia's PR industry beast.

Not so much what he puts in, but all that he leaves out. as if Pomerantsev has been aping the very sort of "avant-garde" Kremlin political technologies he's been scaring the Ed Royces of the world with.

Glaring omissions of context, that had me start to question if Pomernatsev wasn't manipulating the reader by poaching the rhetoric of leftist critical analysis, and putting it to use for very different, neocon purposes . And then of course there's the larger nagging question—what the Hell is a presumed journalist/writer like Pomerantsev, who claims to have been most influenced by literary figures like Christopher Isherwood, doing lobbying the US and UK governments to pass bills upping psychological warfare budgets and imposing sanctions on foreign countries?

Time magazine wound up crediting the Americans with “Rescuing Boris,” which was turned into a B-movie, “Spinning Boris,” directed by "Turner & Hootch"'s Roger Spottiswoode.