This type of behavior is called "moral licensing," or doing something good to excuse bad behavior later.

You might have heard people say "I can't be racist; my friends are black," or "I can't be racist; I voted for Obama." Stanford psychologists found that these sayings are a way for people to show their "moral credentials," and that many of those who vote for Obama felt much more comfortable with voicing their prejudices later.

Even though Bryan says it won't be a problem, we can't totally be sure because people, no matter their hypothetical views on race, can still react differently when it's their children in a real situation.

Some black people have said it jokingly, and some white people have said it to black people, fetishizing and reducing them to the color of their skin.

So it's no wonder this is a red flag to many people or why there was backlash. It could be a sign that a person views black people solely to sexualize them.

When it was announced that Rachel Lindsay would be the Bachelorette — the first black woman to take the position — I wondered how the producers would handle it.

I also wondered how it would make the show different, and how it would stay the same.

It didn't take long for fans to find racist tweets from Lee's past, so chances are the producers who had to vet these men before meeting with Rachel knew about them, too — and they still cast Lee to be one of the many possible men who could marry her.

Many people who aren't normally subjected to racism might wonder why a person who has these views about Black Lives Matter would date a black woman. First of all, racists hardly like to identify as being racist.Rachel Lindsay's season may look like just any other season to many fans of the show.But for many black women, these situations have most likely reflected their own dating experiences back to them.She previously asked Bryan if his family would accept her and he assures her that they will.In 2017, this might seem like a weird question, but I found myself asking the same question to my white boyfriend years ago when we were getting serious.I've been referred to as this mythical type of black person who "isn't like the others" — and was expected to take it as a compliment.