We tested any with at least a million active users in the US.

It’s impossible to know exactly how many users are active on a given site or app (especially because mobile users aren’t reflected in Alexa data), but we’re definitely in the ballpark.

That said, the fact that Ok Cupid, Tinder, and Bumble are free definitely stands out.

Bumble offers an experience that’s very similar to Tinder, but with a twist: Women have to start the conversation.

If they don’t, the match will disappear after 24 hours, although you can upgrade to a paid account to keep matches around longer.

We like Ok Cupid's whole package — a huge user base, slick interface, the fact that it’s free — but its real strength lies in its robust matching algorithm.

It not only asks you questions about your personality, likes, and dislikes (“Do you think women have an obligation to keep their legs shaved?

In early 2017, Barron’s estimated that Tinder has about 30 million active users and Bumble is close to 10 million.

Good online dating profiles are both extremely important and surprisingly hard to find.

Not into the idea of creating a full-blown dating profile? As opposed to a matching algorithm that evaluates your answers to various questions, Tinder is all about first impressions — your photos are the most prominent part of your profile.

And it’s easy to get started: upload a few snaps from your Facebook profile, add an optional bio, and start swiping through other users in your area.

All of our top dating apps use an algorithm to match you with people you should be compatible with and interested in — and keep those “automatic nos” out of your feed.

This is the real heart of online dating (anyone could sift through profiles on their own) and some sites and apps do it better than others.

Since our tester was a straight woman, her experience with online dating is weighted more toward receiving messages than sending messages.