(Hi-res version of this photo here.) Note also that the review directly above Obama’s review is of a book about domestic terrorists and bombers. And this is a screenshot of the Lexis-Nexis listing on the library’s computer, proving that the review is part of the official digital archives.

** Warning: this is a departure from my typical blog post.

Turns out the review was very short — what I had thought (from reading the citations in the online articles) were just short quotes from it was in fact the entirety of the review.

But it was accompanied by a photo of Obama, standing by his statement.

Feel free to ignore this section unless you’re interested in seeing “proof” that the review is real.

This shows the entirety of page 5 of the book section on December 21, 1997. (Hi-res version of this photo here.) This shows the date and page number at the top of the page, confirming it really is from the on the microfilm machine itself, proving it’s a physical artifact, not a digital Photoshop creation.

The truth of the matter is that there is an extensive “secret menu” available for those in the know.

In fact, the secret items actually outnumber the items legitimately on the menu. If you order a Flying Dutchman, “Flying Dutchman” prints out on your receipt. There is lots of information out there on the Internet about the secret menu, but no one seems to have gotten it all, and a lot of what is out there is just plain wrong.

A mustard-cooked beef patty with additional pickles, cheese, spread and grilled onions diced up and mixed together on the grill before getting dumped on your burger. If you are really worried about your health, you’re in the wrong restaurant.

This is probably the most famous secret menu item, and for good reason: it’s pure awesome on a bun. Not everything that we found on the Internet actually existed.

But because the review was published before the began digitizing and archiving its articles online, there was no direct Web link to the review itself — only citations of it.

So, out of curiosity, I took it upon myself to visit a library in San Francisco, and using the library’s Lexis-Nexis access and its archive of microfilm versions of major newspapers, including the , I finally tracked down a copy of the actual review itself.

In-N-Out compliments the food with the standard array of Coca-Cola beverages and three shakes: chocolate, vanilla and strawberry.